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Music may benefit older adults with cognitive impairment

[May 19, 2021: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society]



Active music-making can provide cognitive benefits to older adults with mild cognitive impairment or dementia, according to an analysis of all relevant studies. The analysis, which is published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, also found that music may help improve their quality of life and mood.


The analysis included nine studies with a total of 495 participants. The authors noted that music-based interventions could potentially provide millions of older adults with critical support for their cognitive, emotional, and social well-being.


"We are excited to see these results because participating in music, like singing in a choir or playing in a drum circle, is a safe, engaging activity that our research demonstrates can support cognition at a critical time for older adults facing cognitive decline," said lead author Jennie L. Dorris, MM, of the University of Pittsburgh.



Additional Information


Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.17208



About Journal


Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) is the go-to journal for clinical aging research. We provide a diverse, interprofessional community of healthcare professionals with the latest insights on geriatrics education, clinical practice, and public policy—all supporting the high-quality, person-centered care essential to our well-being as we age. Since the publication of our first edition in 1953, JAGS has remained one of the oldest and most impactful journals dedicated exclusively to gerontology and geriatrics.



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Tags: #New_Discovery, #Music, #Aging, #Medical_Good_News, #The_Brighter_Side_of_News